Job Opportunities

The laboratory of Sarah Goetz at Duke University School of Medicine, Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology is inviting applications for a postdoctoral researcher.

Our group studies the biology of the primary cilium, an essential organelle that mediates critical intracellular signaling pathways. We are working to identify the signaling pathways that control the assembly of primary cilia, as well as to define the roles of cilia in embryonic development and in human diseases. We use cell culture as well as mouse models to explore these questions.

Ideal candidates will be accomplished, highly motivated, and creative scientists with a recent Ph.D. in the life sciences (less than 2 years of postdoctoral experience is strongly preferred), or who anticipate completion of their degree prior to starting the position. Applicants should email a brief cover letter describing research accomplishments and future research goals, current CV with list of publications, and contact information for 3 professional references to:
sarah.c.goetz@duke.edu

For more information, see www.goetzlabduke.com

 

Postdoc position in the laboratory of Don Fox, Ph.D.

A postdoctoral fellow position is available in the laboratory of Don Fox, Ph.D. We are seeking a collaborative postdoc to take the lead on a new fly-to-human project (funded externally by both NCI and ACS) that aims to identify how Ras oncogenes overcome weak translation imparted by rare codons. The candidate would work with both the fly system (in the Fox lab) and in mammalian systems (in collaboration with our Duke collaborators in the lab of Dr. Chris Counter).

We are specifically interested in a candidate with prior experience in either Drosophila or mammalian cells, who would enjoy close collaboration with both labs.

Please send a CV and list of 3 references to Don Fox (don.fox@duke.edu). Please also include a cover letter indicating how your prior experience and current research interests align with the interests of the lab.

 


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